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  • Arwen Mohun, Henry Clay Reed Professor of History in the History Department at the University of Delaware

    Henry Clay Reed Professor of History
    University of Delaware
    121 John Munroe Hall
    Newark, DE 19716
    302-831-2371

    Biography

    Arwen P. Mohun specializes in the social and cultural historian of technology.   Her publications include Steam Laundries: Gender, Work, and Technology in the United States and Great Britain, 1880-1940 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999); His and Hers: Gender, Consumption and Technology (University of Virginia Press, 1998) co-edited with Roger Horowitz; and Gender and Technology: A Reader (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003) co-edited with Nina Lerman and Ruth Oldenziel.

    In her most recent book, Risk: Negotiating Safety in American Society (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013), Professor Mohun explores the changing ways Americans have understood and managed everyday risk from the 18th century to the present.  Risk was awarded the 2014 Ralph Gomery Prize from the Business History Conference.

    Publications

    Books:

    • Risk: Negotiating Safety in American Society (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013)
    • Steam Laundries: Gender, Work, and Technology in the United States and Great Britain, 1880-1940 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999)

    Edited Volumes

    • His and Hers: Gender, Consumption and Technology (University of Virginia Press, 1998) co-edited with Roger Horowitz
    • Gender and Technology: A Reader (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003) co-edited with Nina Lerman and Ruth Oldenziel

    Articles and Book Chapters

    • "Amusement Parks for the World: The Export of American Technology and Know-How, 1900-1939,” Icon 19 (2014):100-12.
    • “Lightning Rods and the Commodification of Risk in Nineteenth-Century America” in Taming the Electric Fire, edited by Oliver Hochadel and Peter Heering (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 2009).
    • “Labor and Technology” in A Companion to American Technology, Carroll Pursell, ed. (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2005), 212-230.
    • “On the Frontier of the Empire of Chance: Statistics, Accidents, and Risk in Industrializing America” Science in Context 8(September 2005): 337-357
    • “Designed for Thrills and Safety: Gender, Technology, and the Commodification of Risk in the Amusement Park Industry,” Journal of Design History 14 (Fall 2001): 291-306.

 

 

121 John Munroe HallNewark, DE 19716<div class="ExternalClassAF070AA1D85644F0972EEFE4D3316C13"><p>Arwen P. Mohun specializes in the social and cultural historian of technology.   Her publications include <em>Steam Laundries: Gender, Work, and Technology in the United States and Great Britain, 1880-1940</em> (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999); <em>His and Hers: Gender, Consumption and Technology</em> (University of Virginia Press, 1998) co-edited with Roger Horowitz; and <em>Gender and Technology: A Reader</em> (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003) co-edited with Nina Lerman and Ruth Oldenziel.</p><p>In her most recent book, <em>Risk: Negotiating Safety in American Society</em> (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013), Professor Mohun explores the changing ways Americans have understood and managed everyday risk from the 18th century to the present.  <em>Risk</em> was awarded the 2014 Ralph Gomery Prize from the Business History Conference.</p></div><div class="ExternalClass20A0B644FAFA4A3B92D222E16F730558"><h4>Books:</h4><ul><li><em>Risk: Negotiating Safety in American Society</em> (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013)</li><li><em>Steam Laundries: Gender, Work, and Technology in the United States and Great Britain, 1880-1940</em> (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999)</li></ul><h4>Edited Volumes</h4><ul><li><em>His and Hers: Gender, Consumption and Technology</em> (University of Virginia Press, 1998) co-edited with Roger Horowitz</li><li><em>Gender and Technology: A Reader </em>(Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003) co-edited with Nina Lerman and Ruth Oldenziel</li></ul><h4>Articles and Book Chapters</h4><ul><li>"Amusement Parks for the World: The Export of American Technology and Know-How, 1900-1939,” <em>Icon 19 </em>(2014):100-12.</li><li>“Lightning Rods and the Commodification of Risk in Nineteenth-Century America” in <em>Taming the Electric Fire</em>, edited by Oliver Hochadel and Peter Heering (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 2009).</li><li>“Labor and Technology” in <em>A Companion to American Technology</em>, Carroll Pursell, ed. (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2005), 212-230.</li><li>“On the Frontier of the Empire of Chance: Statistics, Accidents, and Risk in Industrializing America” <em>Science in Context 8</em>(September 2005): 337-357</li><li>“Designed for Thrills and Safety: Gender, Technology, and the Commodification of Risk in the Amusement Park Industry,” <em>Journal of Design History 14</em> (Fall 2001): 291-306.</li></ul></div>Publicationsmohun@udel.eduhttps://www.history.udel.edu/Documents%20Bios%20CVs/faculty/mohun-arwen-cv.pdfMohun, Arwen302-831-2371<img alt="Professor Arwen Mohun" src="/Images%20Bios/faculty/Mohun_Arwen.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />Henry Clay Reed Professor of Historyhttp://primus.nss.udel.edu/CoursesSearch/search-results?first_instr_name=Mohun

 

 

Risk: Negotiating Safety in American SocietyMohun, ArwenJohns Hopkins University Press2013https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/content/risk<p>Winner, 2014 Ralph Gomory Prize, Business History </p><p>Conference"Risk" is a capacious term used to describe the uncertainties that arise from physical, financial, political, and social activities. Practically everything we do carries some level of risk—threats to our bodies, property, and animals. How do we determine when the risk is too high? In considering this question, Arwen P. Mohun offers a thought-provoking study of danger and how people have managed it from pre-industrial and industrial America up until today. </p><p>Mohun outlines a vernacular risk culture in early America, one based on ordinary experience and common sense. The rise of factories and machinery eventually led to shocking accidents, which, she explains, risk-management experts and the "gospel of safety" sought to counter. Finally, she examines the simultaneous blossoming of risk-taking as fun and the aggressive regulations that follow from the consumer-products-safety movement. </p><p>Risk and society, a rapidly growing area of historical research, interests sociologists, psychologists, and other social scientists. Americans have learned to tame risk in both the workplace and the home. Yet many of us still like amusement park rides that scare the devil out of us; they dare us to take risks.</p>
Steam Laundries: Gender, Work, and Technology in the United States and Great Britain, 1880-1940Mohun, ArwenJohns Hopkins University Press1999https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/content/steam-laundries<p>​Laundries were once ubiquitous in British and American cities—products of the same historical process that created steel mills and railroads. Unlike the more familiar examples of industrialization, these cleanliness factories remained powerfully identified with domesticity. In <em>Steam Laundries</em>, Arwen Mohun explores broader issues of how gender has shaped how everyday work gets done, who does the work, and how the work is valued. The British-American comparison further reveals differences owing to culture, regulation, and social structure as well as the unexpected transatlantic character of this seemingly localized business.</p>

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  • Department of History
  • 46 W. Delaware Avenue
  • Newark, DE 19716, USA
  • University of Delaware
  • Phone: 302-831-2371
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